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Discover, explore & remember the traditions of Newfoundland’s Cape Shore.

Explore the
Cape Shore

Listen to songs, music & stories. View photos of the people & places. Meet the singers & musicians from Ship Cove, Patrick’s Cove, St Bride’s, and Branch. This interactive map of the Cape Shore is a great way to start navigating your way around the outports of this short stretch of Newfoundland’s coastline.

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Placentia

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Ship's Cove

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Patrick's Cove

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St. Bride's

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Cape St. Mary's

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Branch

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Discover & Explore

The girls from Newfoundland

Henry Nash

The girls from Newfoundland / Henry Nash

The girls from Newfoundland, song (There's a girl in St. John's Harbour that I'm longing now to see …) This wartime song is sung to the tune of “The yellow rose of Texas.” The protagonist is a soldier remembering his sweetheart in St John’s, Newfoundland.

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Transcript of '[The plains of Easter snow]' as sung by James Connors / Aidan O'Hara

The plains of Easter snow, song (And I thought she was Diana fair or the Evening Star that rules the night …) A typed transcript based on Aidan O'Hara's field recording, with annotations and corrections by the collector.

The bonny bunch of roses

Anthony Power

The bonny bunch of roses / Anthony Power

The bonny bunch of roses, song (I overheard a female talking …) The lyrics of this ballad take the form of a conversation between Napoleon Bonaparte’s widow and his son. She warns her son of the danger of challenging England, Ireland, and Scotland—the bonny bunch of roses—and the folly of attacking Russia.  Anthony’s version omits some of the lines that clarify the relationship of the characters, but the singer compensates by rearranging the order of the verses to create a coherent narrative. Most notably, the characters of Napoleon and his son are merged. Historically inaccurate, the song tells a tale of military expansion, of resistance met, and of the ultimate defeat of the invading forces by the opposing allies.

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Patsy Judge on stage at the 1978 Folk Festival / Len Penton, photographer

Patsy Judge on stage at the 1978 Folk Festival / Len Penton, photographer

Patsy Judge playing the whistle on stage at the Second Annual Newfoundland Folk Festival in Bannerman Park, St John's, Newfoundland.

John Joe English sings for an audience of friends, August 1980 / The Radharc Trust Film Archive

John Joe English sings for an audience of friends, August 1980 / The Radharc Trust Film Archive

John Joe English sings for an audience of friends at the Roche house in Branch, Newfoundland, ca. August 1980. This image appears in Radharc's 1981 documentary The Forgotten Irish.

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